Sports network revenue stories educate consumers about more than stock prices

Posted on by Gail

There is reason for sports networks and their corporate parents to be concerned each time a negative revenue report is released in 2016, and it’s not all about dollars and cents on the surface.

Sports networks – ok, ESPN in particular – have a PR challenge, one I’m sure everyone in the sports television industry considers when such a story is reported. It goes further than a headline about a quarterly bottom line.

People often research and cut cords when reports are released about the sports television industry.

There are many consumers that don’t realize that they can get many of their favorite television shows without cable until they read or hear reports about sports television revenues. Each time quarterly statistics are released and logos fly above newspaper headlines, people like me research further into how to omit television services to save money. While I haven’t done it and my insatiable sports appetite and work will keep me from leaving my paid TV service at the curb, I admit that I learn something each time one of these stories is released. The lure of a smaller media bill is enticing, for sure.

In the name of consumers that don’t read the stock market pages, the Bristol, Conn., based company and sports fans everywhere hope these stories slow and proverbial scissors go back into the drawer. Education is power and the more people read, I think the more they will act to cut services or cords.

Disclaimer: I have freelanced with ESPN and other sports network television crews for several years and count staffers among my friends. Network professionals have taught me a great deal about the industry. I am and will be forever grateful.

 

©Gail Sideman; publiside.com 2016

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About Gail

Gail Sideman is a self-described news hound that hustles to meet the needs of an ever-changing media universe. While the way that news is delivered has changed and expanded, Sideman insists that the basics and value of a great story are as entrenched in our desire to know, as ever. Stories that people want to share and hear, she says, is why delivery speed and social media has grown so popular. View all posts by Gail →

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